3 steps to creating more synergy with your employees

People have many needs to satisfy when they make a commitment to work for their employer. The most obvious needs include money and benefits, closely followed by trust, autonomy, work/life balance and meaningful work.

An added bonus is working for a leader who understands the significance of helping his/her employees live their purpose through the work they do. And when individual employees understand their purpose within an organization, the benefits include greater synergy, passion, teamwork, a stronger commitment to self and his/her employer and much less conflict.

Helping employees find and understand their purpose within their roles and that of the company bonds them much closer to the mission of the company.

In larger companies with several hundred employees or more, it’s not uncommon for individuals to feel isolated from senior management or worse, disconnected from understanding the significance of their daily contributions.

This feeling is further amplified when the employee shares an identical role to ten, twenty or even more employees. And it’s understandable why they may lack feelings of fulfillment in their roles.

  1. Firstly, for leaders, helping employees discover their purpose starts with sharing the purpose of the organization with their employees. Each must understand the brand, believe in the brand and be primed to deliver brand expectations.
  2. The second step requires managers to nurture meaningful relationships with his/her employees. Talking with them to gain insights into what strengths they (can) personally bring to the organization (brand) should be the subject of initial conversations. This simple act also goes a long way to strengthen the employer/employee bond. It also gives managers opportunities to give employees new opportunities for growth both personally and professionally within the organization.
  3. The third step is to identify how employees’ strengths align with, and can benefit the organization. Often times, strengths can significantly add to the value of a brand if, and when they are leveraged to full potential.

Helping employees find and practice their sense of purpose is one of the key take-aways in leadership training. It’s a very E.Q. leadership approach, but one that is necessary for organizations that wish to hire and retain the best talent in their respective industries. As one CEO once told me, “I hire those people who do for me what they do as a hobby in their spare time. Everyone at my company must be passionate about what they do.”

If you’ve never spoken with your employees on such a visceral level to uncover their inner strengths, you’re not taking full advantage of the person you hired – only the specific skill set to fill a role. It will be one of the greatest favors you can do for them, for yourself, and for your company.

Guest contributor:  Scott Seroka is an expert in Brand Development and Strategic Communications. He has taken leadership-training courses through Gordon Training International and writes for their blog.

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9 Responses to “3 steps to creating more synergy with your employees”

  1. Zoomit.ca says:

    3 steps to creating more synergy with your employees…

    Helping employees understand their purpose within their roles, and that of the company, bonds them much closer to the mission of the company….

  2. BizSugar.com says:

    3 steps to creating more synergy with your employees…

    Helping employees understand their purpose within their roles, and that of the company, bonds them much closer to the mission of the company….

  3. Rick says:

    “I hire those people who do for me what they do as a hobby in their spare time. Everyone at my company must be passionate about what they do.”

    I like that quote. I recently wrote an article about personal branding for job searches that advocates starting your own website/blog to demonstrate your expertise. The way I figure it, employers are being bombarded with tons of applicants right now since unemployment is so high. And if the hiring manager starts searching for a job applicant online, which more and more are doing just that, then having them see your knowledge and passion for your career may put you at the top of the hiring list.
    Rick recently posted..The Education DifferenceMy Profile

  4. Thanks for the comment, Rick. I totally agree with you about having one’s own website/blog. Everyone is on LinkedIn but how have their own site? Seems like a no brainer but actually not very common.

  5. Celia says:

    Let’s remember the one role we all have is helping one another advance and not just getting ourselves ahead. Altruism is not soo bad in the workplace. This was a pertinent and well-written article.

  6. Harry says:

    Employees who do not feel that the work they are doing is connected to the company’s goal and are making meaningful contribution will bring just hands and leg and not their brains. That’s why it is important for the leaders to establish that connection and create synergy between employees and employers.
    Harry recently posted..How can you be Tough without being a Jerk to Succeed in Small Business?My Profile

  7. Employees are the heart and soul of any business. Business owners or managers who neglect this fact do so at the risk of quality and productivity. So developing synergy with employees should be job one when building a better business.
    Heather Stone recently posted..3 steps to creating more synergy with your employeesMy Profile

  8. Scott says:

    Thanks for your comments everyone. I think most, if not all of us have worked for managers we didn’t get along with and/or respected. It’s amazing how much more productive employees are when they have that connection and synergy with the person they work for. Little changes can make huge differences in the employer/employee relationship.

  9. This is easier said than done. Most organizations are still designed or have industrial-age methods and philosophy of running the business. If we look at Enron, somehow along the way the company has lost her purpose. Enron’s purpose was not making money, because they were not making money. Enron failed to create the context to facilitate the purpose of both parties, the company and the employees.
    Jonathan Young recently posted..No last blog posts to return.My Profile

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